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Tajikistan Wrap-Up

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Well, that’s it! I’m home! It seems like everything went so quickly. One second it’s 3 in the morning in Dushanbe and I’m saying goodbye to everyone, the next I’m sitting in the Istanbul airport, and now suddenly I’m sitting back in my own bedroom blogging. What a crazy trip!

In the end, however, it’s important to look back on what I got out of it. I learned so many things on the trip, but for your benefit, I’ll condense it into five points:

  • The Tajiks have a much higher amount of bread in a day than what anyone in the U.S. could guess at
  • Even though Tajik is written with the same alphabet as Russian, the two are very different languages
  • Many people I talked with wanted to learn English (or become more fluent with it) and/or travel to the U.S. – we may not think it, but there are countries that look up to us
  • Despite the fact that the government of Tajikistan is run in a very different way than our own, the lives of the people themselves are not too greatly affected (from what I saw, anyway)
  • Even though Pakistan, Tajikistan, and the U.S. are so far apart, we have much more in common than what you’d think (various customs, food preferences, etc.)

In addition to the things I learned, I also have a number of physical items by which I can remember the trip. For those of you who are curious, I’ll put a picture down below. As always, feel free to leave questions in the comment section.

In addition to that, I’d like to make it known that Turkish Airlines is a very high-quality airline, and they really try to treat you well. Don’t let negative reviews fool you.

Thank you everyone for reading!

LOOSELY FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: a traditional Pakistani hat, an iEARN briefcase, pictures from Khujand City, hand-knit miniature socks, a Pakistani flag pin, a Tajikistan keyring, a magnet with a Tajik street scene, two photo books of pictures taken during this and last year's iEARN project, a hand-painted spoon, a picture of a historical museum in Pakistan, magnets shaped like the rolls we were always seeing, a carved stone reptile, a certificate and diploma from iEARN, and a Tajik satchel

LOOSELY FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: a traditional Pakistani hat, an iEARN briefcase, pictures from Khujand City, hand-knit miniature socks, a Pakistani flag pin, a Tajikistan keyring, a magnet with a Tajik street scene, two photo books of pictures taken during this and last year’s iEARN project, a hand-painted spoon, a picture of a historical museum in Pakistan, magnets shaped like the rolls we were always seeing, a carved stone reptile, a certificate and diploma from iEARN, and a Tajik satchel

Link to my Google Blog

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